Stretch Patterns

Now that this pattern has been released on the website, it's time to put up some sewing instructions.  At first the pattern shape appears weird and unusual, as it did for me when I first found this little beauty at the US patent office.  The original blog post describes my process - Pattern Puzzle - The Patent Blouse.  When cutting your own Patent Blouse, please make sure you use two-way stretch knit for the best results (four-way stretch knit in the US).

This unusual sewing pattern has been featured on my blog for a very long time.  As early as December, 2013.  Right from the very beginning it's been a favourite.  I've made myself at least eight of these tops in a great variety of fabrics: merino/lycra, viscose/elastane, cotton/elastane and rayon/elastane.  It's really important to understand that all fabrics for my samples are two-way stretch jersey (four-way in the US) with some elastane content (lycra/spandex).  My favourites are the merino/elastane, with a soft, draped handle in both red and black. You can get yourself a copy of this amazing sewing pattern, here on my website: The Patent Blouse Sizes XS-XXL.

If you'd like to get yourself a classic Tee-shirt pattern, my Boat Neck Tee pattern is not overly tight, with soft shaping on the side seam, a boat neckline and three-quarter sleeves.  For most of us the first pattern alteration, depending on the weather, will be sleeve length alterations.

I simply can't believe that I've never shared my sample makes for this amazing top. I suppose I was so busy turning it into a workshop that missed the obvious.  So you may remember the original post from January 2015 - Pattern Insights - Jersey Twist Patterns.  I used my Women's Knit Block to demonstrate the simplest way to achieve jersey twist patterns.  The same method makes both single and double twist patterns.  This is not the only method for making jersey twist patterns and you'll find other examples on my 'well-suited' blog.

This pattern is one of my 'Off-the-Rails' sewing patterns that I've worked with for many years.  The Boat Neck Teeis a wardrobe classic when cut in a plain cloth and seriously quirky when you mix your print and plain knit fabrics. Although the image below is of a half sleeve tee-shirt, the pattern comes with a three-quarter sleeve.  I'll be adding a post to the blog very soon showing the sleeve pattern alterations for short and long sleeves.

Here we have another re-issue of my very early Pattern Puzzle posts. I've up-dated the images and improved the instructions.  I'm really enjoyed the regular Saturday morning Pattern Puzzles on my facebook page and hope to return to them sometime soon.  Here is the sketch, pattern plan and pattern pieces for the front of the Triple Twist Jersey dress.  Please note this style only works with my knit block and two-way stretch jersey fabric.

Following on from the Skirt Block and Design Options post I've separated skirt designs that use a stretch skirt block to start your pattern development.  You can use my skirt block to make a stretch skirt block to use with all these pattern puzzle posts.  Some of them have been sampled and those sample posts are also included here.

Use my Knit Block to make all these Pattern Puzzles:

This post has been curated to bring the focus to my garment blocks now available on the website. They are the same blocks I use in my pattern puzzles and the same basic blocks that are the foundation of commercial pattern making. The first block for the spotlight is my Knit Block.

Inspired by fans, I've finally had a go at the Kimono Twist Dress from the Pattern Puzzles series.  My first pattern was cut from a knit kimono block that I made from my Basic Knit Block that's now available here.  I used a mid-weight two-way stretch jersey in a near-block aubergine.  And although I've identified some issues for improvement, this first sample's not too shabby.

Does anyone remember this little pattern puzzle from last year?   It's been a long time waiting in the wings for posting.  An innovation on an existing theme, this single twist is ingenious in that a cowl is built as part of the twist pattern.   The final effect being a more subtle twist with a relaxed fit.  If you'd like to learn my method for creating Twist Drape Patterns I have a detailed worksheet for making Jersey Twist Patterns.  For just a few dollars you'll get the same training you'd get if you came to the workshop in my studio.  My Knit Block is also available as a PDF download.
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