Pattern Making

The #PatternPuzzle was quite a hit with our Facebook fans on Saturday.  In many ways a straightforward pattern that yields fab results.  Use any loose-fit tee shirt pattern or alter my knit block to make this fashion-forward Twist Tee.  If you'd like to learn my method for creating Twist Drape Patterns I have a detailed worksheet for making Jersey Twist Patterns.  For just a few dollars you'll get the same training you'd get if you came to the workshop in my studio.

Since the earliest of my pattern making days I have had a passion for the tailored femininity of vintage styling.  And now that I have discovered an extensive online community that enjoys both fashion and vintage designs I am presented with so many beautiful options for our weekly pattern puzzle.   I found this weeks inspiring imagein a wonderful tumblr blog, The Tailors Desire, full of all things vintage.  :)

You may be forgiven for thinking that we often torture the stuffing out of our fabulous #PatternPuzzle fans.  Well, last Saturday was no exception.  I did a slightly tricky thing with a 'grown-on hood' and it was enough to make the pattern shapes very hard to read.  I have seen similar styles in both historic and current fashion and have waited some time to try this out on the blog.  The idea I have is to cut this dress from my knit block using a merino jersey.  That could be either a one-way or two-way stretch knit.  The Double Drape in this Maxi refers to the #CowlDrape on the back of this dress and the #GatheredDrape on the centre front (CF) seam.  The hood styling may also be considered a #CowlDrape with the large tuck and the centre back (CB) line on the fold.

A huge thanks to all the fans that turned up on Saturday to play and watch the #PatternPuzzle.  This weeks puzzle was less complex than most but a favourite for the wardrobe.  Our post this week has two versions of the Tucked Drape Top, the first with two large tucks facing each other on the front neckline and the second with one large tuck only in the front neckline.

I finally had a chance to use some of the wonderful work in the Gil Brandao book.  In particular, this pattern hooked me from the beginning as it doesn't seem to make any sense.  To start with, the thing that looks like a dart is really an armhole?  And that thing that looks like a sleeve is in fact, a waist tie. As you can imagine I was looking forward to an interesting fitting.
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