introductory Tag

Last weekend's #PatternPuzzle was a little different from our usual pattern shapes.  From the conversation you can see that some pattern pieces are obvious and some not so much.  The self-drafted image below is one of the most effective examples I have come across of zero-waste pattern making, typical of a lot of folk costume construction.

Solved with lightening speed by Alison Calderwood, Julie Eilber and RedPointTailor, last Saturdays #PatternPuzzle turns out to be a fab summer shift.  The image below has the puzzle shape right way up with some notations to help make sense of the thing.   Some of you may remember the Cowl Tee with Drape and Draped Tee from way back that feature the same kind of drape seam as this weeks puzzle.

Looking a lot like an origami bat, this weeks self-drafted #PatternPuzzle comes from some of the greatest minds of the 1960's - the inventors filing patents for the next best thing in clothing production.  July 2019 - this pattern is now available as a PDF download on this website - The Patent Blouse Sizes XS-XXL

A big thank you to everyone who contributed to our #PatternPuzzle conversation on Saturday.

Here is the anonymous shape that was posted on our Facebook Page.  A self-drafted rectangle with three notches - that's all they got!  And they were very creative with the information.  Have a look at the comments!

The inspiration behind Saturday's Pattern Puzzle has been doing the rounds of a few designers over the past 12 months.  I have cut it at least twice for different clients in the past year.  In the world of drape, it's definitely the new kid on the block.  Simple and uncomplicated this style has a casual and formal application.  I personally like the casual application and plan to make it as a tunic top to go over jeans or a long slim skirt.

Wandering around in Pinterest I repinned the images below from Red Point Tailor! to my #cuttthatfrock album.  I was fascinated with the strange little pattern diagram on the back of the envelope.  The images claim that this simple shape would make that wrap top and that you can wear it wrapped from the front or the back.  Mmmm... big claims for a simple shape and such sophisticated drawings!  Convinced I could scale this up to make sense of it, I imported the image into illustrator.

In this second stage, the 'nejiri' Twist evolves into something new.  Continuing on from the earlier photo tutorial post about my investigations into yet more twist patterns.  It's important to remember that the success of these twists depends on using two-way stretch knit.  Both the existing toiles in this test are merino and merino blends with elastane.

Alterations to the first sample included reducing the upper body length to refine the drape and tightening the hip fit so the twist will stay in place.

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